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LED GUIDE
How can I pay?
Payment Methods
Do you ship to my country?
Yes, we work with a international express courier for all shipments and can also ship our product to your country.
Most country destinations have been activated, so in the order process you can probably choose your own country. If your country does not appear on the list please contact our customer service.

We currently do not ship to the USA; due to the 110V USA power supply the units will not function correctly.
How safe are your products?
Our products have been developed and tested with great care, we advise you to follow the safety instructions:
-For the safety of everyone in your household, never remove product covering/case. Do not try to replace parts by yourself. Always consult a professional electrician.
-Reduce the risk of fire or electric shock; the LED should never be exposed to rain or moisture. Objects filled with liquids, such as vases, bottles, etc should not be placed on or near the LED.
-Never directly look in the light, this will damage your vision and can cause temporary blindness.
-Do not install near any heat sources such as heat emitting lights, radiators, electrical heaters, or other heat sources.
-Only use the original power cord and only use with approved accessories. If the provided plug does not fit into your outlet, consult an electrician for replacement.
-When plugging the power cord into the wall unit, make sure it is fully inserted in the socket.
-Protect the power cord from being walked on or pulled, particularly at plugs and the point where the power cord exits the LED grow light
-Use strong cables or chains to position the unit and make sure that they have been well fitted to the ceiling and the light. We are not responsible for drop-damage caused to the LED.
-Unplug the LED during lightning storms or when unused for long periods of time.
-Refer all servicing to qualified service personnel. Servicing is required when the LED has been damaged in any way, such as power-supply cord damage, liquid /objects have fallen into the LED, the LED unit has been exposed to rain or moisture, not operated normally, or has been dropped.
-For disposal or recycling information, please contact your local authorities, electronic devices should be recycled after their use.
What is your warranty protocol?
Each light in the Crazy LED collection has been carefully chosen for component quality and manufacturing quality. The guarantee we give varies from model to model.

How does it work?
The warranty covers the repair or replacement of your LED grow light in case of defects or malfunctions. The warranty period is valid from the purchase date. It includes all components and labour needed to get the device working correctly again. If a component is no longer available we will replace it with an equivalent component or exchange the LED grow light. The warranty period is valid from the purchase date. Crazy LED will not extend the warranty period in case of repairs or replacement within the warranty protocol.

Our warranty covers normal usage of your LED grow light in the country from where it was purchased. We can refuse shipments to areas other then where it was first purchased. In case of repairs the buyer has to pay the postage for shipment to our office and the items must be returned in its original packaging. We will do our utmost to solve any issues as quickly as possible. The warranty does not apply without the original purchase invoice.

The warranty does NOT cover:
Defects caused by: -Accidental damage. (such as dropping the unit, spilling water on it, etc) -Careless operation. -Any other use other than what the unit is intended for (indoor home growing) -Use of components and accessories provided by third parties. -Faulty assembly, installation, or repairs by others then Crazy LED. -Shipment damage of the LED grow light from the customer to our office due to poor packaging.

If you experience any problems with your LED grow light after the warranty period we still advise you to contact us. Perhaps there is an easy and effective way to help you solve the problem, even after the official warranty period ends
How long will shipping take?
Shipping times depend on your destination. At most European addresses your order will be delivered within 24 hours after receiving payment. Some remote areas and destinations outside of Europe will take longer.
Where do you produce your lights?
It varies from supplier to supplier. We have supplied indoor grow lights from Europe and North America.
Crazy LEDs

Lighting Metrics | PAR, PPF, PPFD & Photon Efficiency

If you have been researching LED horticulture lighting systems for your plant growth facility, you have likely been bombarded with a variety of metrics that lighting manufacturers use to market their products. Some terms and acronyms you are likely to see include: watts, lumens, LUX, foot candles, PAR, PPF, PPFD, and photon efficiency. While all of these terms do relate to lighting, only a select few really tell you the important metrics of a horticulture lighting system. The purpose of this article is to define these terms and acronyms, correct some common misunderstandings, and help growers understand which metrics are applicable to horticulture lighting systems, and which ones are not.

Light

Figure 1: Photosynthetic light response curves

Humans use Lumens

Plants and people perceive light very differently from one another. Humans and many other animals use something called photopic vision in well-lit conditions to perceive color and light. Lumens are a unit of measurement based on a model of human eye sensitivity in well-lit conditions, which is why the model is called the photopic response curve (Figure 1). As you can see, the photopic response curve is bell shaped and shows how humans are much more sensitive to green light, than blue or red light. LUX, and foot candle meters measure the intensity of light (using lumens) for commercial and residential lighting applications, with the only difference between the two being the unit of area they are measured over (LUX uses lumen/m2 and foot candle uses lumen/ft2).Using LUX or foot candle meters to measure the light intensity of horticulture lighting systems will give you varying measurements depending on the spectrum of the light source, even if you are measuring the same intensity of PAR.The fundamental problem with using LUX or foot candle meters when measuring the light intensity of horticulture lighting systems is the underrepresentation of blue (400 – 500 nm) and red (600 – 700 nm) light in the visible spectrum. Humans may not be efficient at perceiving light in these regions, but plants are highly efficient at using red and blue light to drive photosynthesis. This is why lumens, LUX, and foot candles should never be used as metrics for horticulture lighting.


PAR is photosynthetic active radiation. PAR light is the wavelengths of light within the visible range of 400 to 700 nanometers (nm) which drive photosynthesis (Figure 1). PAR is a much used (and often misused) term related to horticulture lighting. PAR is NOT a measurement or “metric” like feet, inches or kilos. Rather, it defines the type of light needed to support photosynthesis. The amount and spectral light quality of PAR light are the important metrics to focus on. (To find out more about spectral light quality click here). Quantum sensors are the primary instrument used to quantify the light intensity of horticulture lighting systems. These sensors work by using an optical filter to create a uniform sensitivity to PAR light (Figure 1), and can be used in combination with a light meter to measure instantaneous light intensity or a data logger to measure cumulative light intensity.
Three important questions you should look to be answered when researching horticulture lighting systems are:
  • How much PAR the fixture produces (measured as Photosynthetic Photon Flux)?
  • How much instantaneous PAR from the fixture is available to plants (measured as Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density)?
  • How much energy is used by the fixture to make PAR available to your plants (measured as Photon Efficiency).

The three key metrics used to answer these questions are:

PPF is photosynthetic photon flux. PPF  measures the total amount of PAR that is produced by a lighting system each second. This measurement is taken using a specialized instrument called an integrating sphere that captures and measures essentially all photons emitted by a lighting system. The unit used to express PPF is micromoles per second (μmol/s). This is probably the second most important way of measuring a horticulture lighting system, but, for whatever reason, 99.9% of lighting companies don’t list this metric. It is important to note that PPF does not tell you how much of the measured light actually lands on the plants, but is an important metric if you want to calculate how efficient a lighting system is at creating PAR.


PPFD is photosynthetic photon flux density. PPFD measures the amount of PAR that actually arrives at the plant, or as a scientist might say: “the number of photosynthetically active photons that fall on a given surface each second”. PPFD is a ‘spot’ measurement of a specific location on your plant canopy, and it is measured in micromoles per square meter per second (μmol/m2/s). If you want to find out the true light intensity of a lamp over a designated growing area (e.g. 4’ x 4’), it is important that the average of several PPFD measurements at a defined height are taken. Lighting companies that only publish the PPFD at the center point of a coverage area grossly overestimate the true light intensity of a fixture. A single measurement does not tell you much, since horticulture lights are generally brightest in the center, with light levels decreasing as measurements are taken towards the edges of the coverage area. (Caveat Emptor: Lighting manufacturers can easily manipulate PPFD data. To ensure you are getting actual PPFD values over a defined growing area, the following needs to be published by the manufacturer: measurement distance from light source (vertical and horizontal), number of measurements included in the average, and the min/max ratio). Fluence always publishes the average PPFD over a defined growing area at a recommended mounting height for all of our lighting systems.

3xSANlight S4W PPFD

Figure 2: PPFD measurements 3 x SANlight Logo S4W @ 1,44m2 / 15.5ft2
• Power Consumption 420W
• PPF Light Engine: 1218µmol/s
• PPF System: 1152µmol/s

Conditions of measurement

• Distance to sensor: 30cm / 11.8 in
• Environment: HOMEbox Ambient Q120 (120 x 120cm / 47.2 x 47.2 in)
• Measure grid: 10cm / 3.9 in

Result:
Ø PPF: 528µmol/m2/s


Photon Efficiency refers to how efficient a horticulture lighting system is at converting electrical energy into photons of PAR. Many horticulture lighting manufacturers use total electrical watts or watts per square foot as a metric to describe light intensity. However, these metrics really don’t tell you anything since watts are a measurement describing electrical input, not light output. If the PPF of the light is known along with the input wattage, you can calculate how efficient a horticulture lighting system is at converting electrical energy into PAR.  As a reminder, the unit for PPF is μmol/s, and the unit to measure watts is Joule per second (J/s), therefore, the seconds in the numerator and denominator cancel out, and the unit becomes µmol/J. The higher this number is, the more efficient a lighting system is at converting electrical energy into photons of PAR.


PAR intensity guide

Figure 3: PAR Intensity Guide, Source: MIGRO


Photosynthetic response of Cannabis sativa L. to variations in photosynthetic photon flux densities, temperature and CO2 conditions

Effect of different photosynthetic photon flux densities (0, 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000 μmol m(-2)s(-1)), temperatures (20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 °C) and CO2 concentrations (250, 350, 450, 550, 650 and 750 μmol mol(-1)) on gas and water vapour exchange characteristics of Cannabis sativa L. were studied to determine the suitable and efficient environmental conditions for its indoor mass cultivation for pharmaceutical uses. The rate of photosynthesis (PN) and water use efficiency (WUE) of Cannabis sativa increased with photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFD) at the lower temperatures (20-25 °C). At 30 °C, PN and WUE increased only up to 1500 μmol m(-2)s(-1) PPFD and decreased at higher light levels. The maximum rate of photosynthesis (PN max) was observed at 30 °C and under 1500 μmol m(-2)s(-1) PPFD. The rate of transpiration (E) responded positively to increased PPFD and temperature up to the highest levels tested (2000 μmol m(-2)s(-1) and 40 °C). Similar to E, leaf stomatal conductance (gs) also increased with PPFD irrespective of temperature. However, gs increased with temperature up to 30 °C only. Temperature above 30 °C had an adverse effect on gs in this species. Overall, high temperature and high PPFD showed an adverse effect on PN and WUE. A continuous decrease in intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) and therefore, in the ratio of intercellular CO2 to ambient CO2 concentration (Ci/Ca) was observed with the increase in temperature and PPFD. However, the decrease was less pronounced at light intensities above 1500 μmol m(-2)s(-1). In view of these results, temperature and light optima for photosynthesis was concluded to be at 25-30 °C and ∼1500 μmol m(-2)s(-1) respectively. Furthermore, plants were also exposed to different concentrations of CO2 (250, 350, 450, 550, 650 and 750 μmol mol(-1)) under optimum PPFD and temperature conditions to assess their photosynthetic response. Rate of photosynthesis, WUE and Ci decreased by 50 %, 53 % and 10 % respectively, and Ci/Ca, E and gs increased by 25 %, 7 % and 3 % respectively when measurements were made at 250 μmol mol-1 as compared to ambient CO2 (350 μmol mol(-1)) level. Elevated CO2 concentration (750 μmol mol(-1)) suppressed E and gs ∼ 29% and 42% respectively, and stimulated PN, WUE and Ci by 50 %, 111 % and 115 % respectively as compared to ambient CO2 concentration. The study reveals that this species can be efficiently cultivated in the range of 25 to 30 °C and ∼1500 μmol m(-2)s(-1) PPFD. Furthermore, higher PN, WUE and nearly constant Ci/Ca ratio under elevated CO2 concentrations in C. sativa, reflects its potential for better survival, growth and productivity in drier and CO2 rich environment.

Source: Chandra S1, Lata H, Khan IA, Elsohly MA, Physiol Mol Biol Plants. 2008 Oct;14(4):299-306. doi: 10.1007/s12298-008-0027-x. Epub 2009 Feb 26

So for Cannabis, bottom threshold for optimal growth and photosynthesis is a DLI of 22 would be:
24/0 schedule: 254.6 micromoles/m2/s-1
18/6 schedule: 339.5 micromoles/m2/s-1
12/12 schedule: 509.25 micromoles/m2/s-1

For Cannabis, the Top threshold for optimal growth and photosynthesis is a DLI of 65 moles per day.
*extremely important notice, only go up to these amounts if you are using supplemental CO2, do not go this high if you are not using supplemental CO2 as you will actually slow down photosynthesis and waste energy.

24/0 schedule: 752.31 micromoles/m2/s-1
18/6 schedule: 1003.08 micromoles/m2/s-1
12/12 schedule: 1504.6 micromoles/m2/s-1

The generally accepted guidelines for artificial light PPFD in flowering are this:
in a 12/12


PPFD of at least 510 micromoles/m2/s-1 for the low end of optimal intensity
PPFD of at least 800-1100 micromoles/m2/s-1 for perfect optimal lighting without additional CO2.
PPFD of at least 800-1500 micromoles/m2/s-1 for perfect optimal lighting WITH additional CO2.



Source: Fluence BML / SANlight